Match-fixing fears at Australian Open after suspicious betting detected

“We run much like a stock exchange in terms of our day-to-day work.”

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Traders at the website Pinnacle Sports suspended betting on the match approximately 13 hours before it began. Sportsbook head Marco Blume told The Times that from the time betting on the match opened Thursday, so much money was bet on Hlavackova and Kubot that the website was forced to change the match odds. When that didn’t stop the flow, the website reduced the maxiumum amount for a single bet from $500 to $100 before suspending betting completely.

. Marrero said he was battling an injury in explaining the pair’s performance, which included 12 unforced errors to Hlavackova and Kubot’s four.

“Even the slightest disturbance in the betting sets off any alarms on my trading floor,” Blume told The Times. That amount is more than 12 times the combined amount bet on three other first-round mixed doubles matches at the Australian Open.

The International Tennis Federation, which oversees all four Grand Slam events, including the Australian Open, had no immediate comment.

The investigators alleged that the suspicious players were not disciplined by tennis officials, who in turn have claimed the investigators did not present enough evidence for them to take any action.

The incident, which was first reported by The New York Times, comes a week after the BBC and Buzzfeed reported that investigators had repeatedly flagged 16 unnamed players on suspicion of repeatedly throwing matches in exchange for cash.

The first-round match in question was won by the pairing of Andrea Hlavackova and Lukasz Kubot, 6-0 6-3, over the pairing of Lara Arruabarrena and David Marrero.

The issue of possible match-fixing reared its head again at tennis’ Australian Open Sunday when a major sports gambling website stopped taking bets on a mixed-doubles match after noticing that far more money than usual was being wagered on one of the pairings.

The Times also reported that approximately $25,000 had been wagered on the match through another website, Betfair

Would legalized sports gambling in N.J. mean a loss for the mob?

“They won’t even put a dent in it.”

To watch Jack Ford’s full report, watch the video in the player above. All Rights Reserved.

© 2014 CBS Interactive Inc. The state hopes to collect millions.

However, as CBS News’ legal analyst Jack Ford reports on “60 Minutes Sports,” the ruling won’t put the mob out of business.

“Because they won’t take it over,” he said. No one’s ever gonna stop it.”

Ford asked Alite why he’s okay with letting New Jersey legalizing sports gambling. You’re not looking for John and Nancy Adams to walk in and order champagne cocktails and pomegranate martinis,” he said. That ain’t your weed. “Gambling’s going on anyway. “That ain’t what you do.

If it becomes legal, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie has said there would be strict state oversight, much like the way it works at his state’s Atlantic City’s casinos.

But Angelo Lutz, who is a legitimate businessman and restaurateur, told Ford that if New Jersey wins, it still won’t have much of an impact on organized crime. He said gambling will always be driven by the customer.

“Because the guy that has no money in his pocket … That ain’t where you draw your money from.”

After two decades with the mob, John Alite told Ford he has given up bookmaking, and now supports efforts to legalize sports gambling.

“If that can help people in the community for their taxes, roads, the infrastructure of whatever goes on in Jersey, why not,” he said. New Jersey is now appealing to the Supreme Court to legalize betting on games.

When Ford asked Luntz if legalizing sports betting would make bookmakers lose some of their business, he said “who cares.”

“You want the degenerate gamblers to bet with you.

Bookmakers and organized crime members have long profited in the high-stakes world of illegal sports gambling. is still going to call the local bookmaker to bet” because it requires no money, he said

Leagues discussing sports betting – ABC News

The NHL’s Gary Bettman has been the only commissioner to speak out since Silver’s op-ed.

While he may not have the full support of the other leagues, Silver says NBA owners approve of his approach. “Should it be viewed in the competitive team-oriented sense that it is now, or does it become a vehicle for betting, which may in effect change the atmosphere in the stadiums and in the arenas?”

“It’s my personal view that there should be federal legislation on this issue, in part to avoid what is happening now,” Silver said. The NHL is currently considering placing a franchise in Las Vegas, and like all the leagues, is participating in daily fantasy sports.

. He wrote an op-ed in The New York Times in November that called for Congress to create a federal framework and allow states to authorize betting on pro sports.

“The Donaghy controversy also made me aware how important it is that we have a way of monitoring irregular activity on our games,” Silver said. LoBiondo and Pallone are hoping Silver’s stance sparks interest in their bills, but both are also wary of the other leagues’ resistance.

“As long you have the other major leagues saying that ‘this is evil and bad’ and ‘we don’t want it,’ that will be an excuse for many to just stay away from it,” LoBiondo said.

“I think there needs some attention to be paid to what sport is going to represent to young people,” Bettman said in an interview with CNN. “But for the FBI knocking on our door and notifying us about Donaghy’s betting, none of the systems that we then had in place had captured any betting by Tim Donaghy.”

Silver said the NBA is not currently taking an active legislative approach, but others are. Donaghy admitted to betting on games he officiated and passing along inside information to gamblers. Major League Baseball, while transitioning to new commissioner Rob Manfred, declined comment. “I think most of our owners’ view on the issue is that they’re comfortable with us taking a leadership position on the issue, but again are also mindful that it’s a complex issue, and is one that will ultimately require a legislative remedy, and not one that is necessarily at the top of their to-do list, in terms of active lobbying.”

In addition, two U.S. Silver said the Donaghy scandal helped shape his new thinking on the legalization of sports betting.

In addition to the conversations between the commissioners, there have been other private meetings between council for the leagues to discuss the pros and cons of legalization, multiple sources with direct knowledge told ESPN.

In September, New Jersey State Sen. “I leave it to them to make any public statements they want to make on it. I will say that certainly all of them are interested in having a better understanding of the issue, and I know have assigned people in their organizations to study intensively the issue as well.”

While discussions are ongoing behind the scenes, Silver is the only active commissioner to come out publicly in support of legalization. John McCain, speaking last week on ESPN podcast “Capital Games,” said he also believes it’s time for Congress to hold hearings to discuss legalizing sports betting.

“While I wouldn’t categorize [daily fantasy] as sports betting,” Silver said, “on the continuum of no betting at all and legalized betting, it’s certainly somewhere on the spectrum, but not yet sports betting.”

The NBA has spoken with the English Premier League about how it handles the betting on its matches and studied financial models in jurisdictions where sports betting is legal, like China, New Zealand and the U.K.

Sources with direct knowledge of the meetings came away believing the NHL is more open to legalization than Bettman’s comments indicate. The NHL did not respond to multiple requests for comment. Sen. “We do know that the more information that is centrally aggregated, the better chance we’ll have of spotting irregular activity on our sport. Jim Whelan and State Assemblyman Vincent Mazzeo sent a letter to the NBA offering a .25 percent commission fee off bets. And that is happening now in the state of Nevada; so we have relationships with the betting companies in Las Vegas, so that we are notified if there’s any irregular activity. Minnesota state representative Phyllis Kahn has told ESPN that she’ll be introducing a similar bill early in this legislative session. “My greatest concern is that there will be in essence a hodgepodge of regulations controlling sports betting that will vary from state to state, jurisdiction to jurisdiction and will make it increasingly difficult to monitor betting on our very own sport.”

Meanwhile, three states, New York, Indiana and South Carolina, have introduced bills to legalize sports betting this year.

“Some of our owners are also owners in other leagues, so it’s something that they also want to talk to the commissioners in the other leagues about,” Silver said. According to Whelan’s office, the NBA responded and expressed interest in discussing the issue, but has not followed up.

“I have talked to the commissioners in the other leagues about [legalizing sports betting],” NBA commissioner Adam Silver said in an exclusive interview with ESPN The Magazine in late January at the league’s Manhattan office. The NFL says its opposition to legalized sports betting has not changed. But we’re also aware that that’s a minuscule percentage of the overall betting on our sport.”

The NBA is not the only professional league in the United States taking a close look at sports betting legalization.

Silver also addressed the gambling scandal involving former NBA referee Tim Donaghy in 2007. New Jersey has been fighting in court against the sports leagues, including the NBA, to bring Las Vegas-style sports betting to its ailing casinos and horse racing tracks for four years. That case is headed to appeals court in the spring.

The other major professional sports leagues are not on the same page. Congressmen, Frank LoBiondo and Frank Pallone of New Jersey, have introduced federal bills to amend the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, the 22-year-old federal ban on state-sponsored sports betting. Discussions on the issue have been taking place between the owners for several years, but until the other leagues come on board, it remains complicated for owners like Ted Leonsis of the Washington Wizards. Leonsis also owns the Washington Capitals of the NHL.

“We’re not ready to take a position on which model is the right one for the NBA,” Silver said. He was convicted and served 15 months in federal prison